A follow-up SciSchmooze

Bob Siederer
24 June 2024

Hello again science fans!

This is the first SciSchmooze of the astronomical summer, what with the solstice having occurred this past Thursday. Different countries refer to the start of summer at different times, some May 1, Some June 1. In the US, we tend to say it starts on Memorial Day. The astronomical start is celebrated by some as Midsummer’s Day.

Last Wednesday was Juneteenth. What seems like a recent holiday has roots going back to 1865. Heather Cox Richardson explains the history, as well as efforts since then to get around the freedom Juneteenth represents.

I want to follow up on two stories I’ve writen about in the past.

Doubting with the SciSchmooze

Herb Masters
10 June 2024

Greetings Science Appreciators, Critical Thinkers and Science and Reason based Skeptics,

The challenge of understanding the meaning, intent, and consequences of what we face these days is immense. I think we need to be able to have confidence in the validity of what you personally believe to make informed decisions that may have major consequences to each of us as well as to the community as a whole. So how do you know what to accept or believe?

Con


The SciSchmooze is 100% Recyclable

Kedonganan Beach in Bali, Indonesia. Credit: Agung Parameswara/Getty Images

Hello again science fans!   科学迷们,大家好!(7 out of 100 Bay Area residents speak Chinese at home.)

ENVIRONMENT

The photo of a Bali beach covered in plastic waste (photo above) is in stark contrast to my mind’s eye image of the renowned Indonesian vacation paradise. If you watch TV with advertisements, you’ve probably seen colorless squashed plastic containers arise into pristine pastel plastic receptacles in an ad from America’s Plastic Makers. It is disingenuous hype f


The Memorial Day Weekend SciSchmooze

Bob Siederer
27 May 2024

May 20, 2013 tornado in Moore, Oklahoma. Credit: Vincent Deligny/AFP/Getty Images

Hello again Science Fans! It is a 3-day holiday weekend for most of us, so enjoy the unofficial beginning of summer. The astronomical start of summer, the summer solstice, occurs on Thursday, June 20 this year. If you want to know more about the solstice, check out this article from the Farmers’ Almanac.


Archeology

Way back in 1930, the


Wait, just an attosecond, please.

Herb Masters
It's 5.20.24 with the SciSchmooze

Melvin Way, "Ruler of the Universe" (c. 1996) Courtesy Andrew Edlin Gallery

Greetings Friends of Science and Reason,

I have recently been noticing a lot of articles about how our world seems to be working now that we have really been tampering with it for the last few hundred years. One of the most compelling is Human Footprint | Top Predator | Episode 2 | PBS from PBS. (If you only open one link from this week’s missive I hope you can watch the


¿Whales Schmoozing with Scientists?

Humpback Whale: Courtesy of HawaiiLife.com

Hello again science fans! Kumusta muli mga tagahanga ng agham! [Three out of every 100 people in the Bay Area speak Tagalog/Filipino at home.]


BIOLOGY / ETHOLOGY

In 1967, Roger Payne and Scott McVay discovered that sounds made by male humpback whales were complex arrangements that lasted as long as 30 minutes before being repeated. Multiple males even sang in unison. From year to year some ‘phrases’ were replaced by new ones. ¿Language? More recently we’ve learned that brain anatomy suggests whales could be capable of language. Also, t


A little bit of everything – SciSchmooze

Bob Siederer
29 April 2024

M76. Credit: NASA, ESA, STScl, A.Pagan (STScl)

Hello again Science fans!

If you are one of those people who, like me, is interested in how things work, you may enjoy this video. It is about Olympic Curling Stones, how they are made, and why they cost so much. The process is fascinating. The granite only comes from one place on earth, Ailsa Craig off the Scotish coast. Two types of granite are used in each stone.

Curling can only be described as an odd sport. It is sort of like shuffleb


And the orbits go on…

herb masters
24.4.22 SciSchmooze

Saturn's Ears

Greetings Science Reasoning Readers,

These are amazing times to be alive. Humans have done fairly well for the last 300,000, or so, years. It seems that as we have become more numerous we have had to increase our resourcefulness and understanding of how things work. Many amazing things have been invented and discovered. Now after a few hundred years of 

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