A Founding Party!

Originally published in BASIS
Volume: 
1
Number: 
1
June 1982

Have you grown weary of having a new acquaintance at a party inquire about your sign, rather than being interested in what you think?

Happily, there are many skeptics in the Bay Area. Come on out so that we can meet one another.

Saturday, June 26, 1982, 7:30 P.M. will be the founding party of the Bay Area Skeptics, at the home of Bob Steiner.

There will be snacks, conversation (REAL conversation), magic, planning, challenges, intellectual stim


Who We Are

Originally published in BASIS
Volume: 
1
Number: 
1
June 1982

We are you, if you are interested. Come on aboard!

The founding members are:
=> Lawrence Jerome, Fellow of CSICOP, science writer, engineer.
=> Wallace I. Sampson, M.D., Member of the Paranormal Health Claims
Subcommittee of CSICOP, and outspoken critic of health fraud.
=> Terence J. Sandbek, Member of the Education Subcommittee of
CSICOP, Clinical Psychologist, Professor of Psychology - American
River College.
=>


Originally published in BASIS
Volume: 
1
Number: 
1
June 1982

From the germ of an idea to realization took just slightly over one month. In today's red-tape-ridden world, that accomplishment borders on the fantastic.

Some of the skeptics in the Bay Area have kept in close contact with others of a similar persuasion. There had become an increasing awareness that we are building a cadre of people interested in critically examining claims of the paranormal.

If that last sentence sounds familiar, take heart. It i


Previous SkepTalks


 
[caption id="attachment_17868" align="aligncenter" width="240"] Nicholas Dufour[/caption] WHAT: Deepfakes, GANs and Visual Misinformation The rise of Deepfakes has prompted intense coverage in the press, concern from government officials, and fear among the public. Deepfakes, along with GANs (generative adversarial networks), are a class of "generative" neural networks capable of creating highly realistic synthetic images. The widespread availability of open-source Deepfake tools means anyone with access to a computer can potentially create photorealistic fake videos and images. These fakes can, for instance, portray high-profile individuals in arbitrary--possibly compromising--situations. Because of their wide availability, relative ease of use, and harm potential, the technology has been the subject of considerable scrutiny and debate. In this talk, we'll discuss the current state of AI-generated imagery, including Deepfakes and GANs: how they work, their capabilities, and what the future may hold. We'll try to separate the hype from reality, and examine the social consequences of these technologies with a special focus on the effect that the ide

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